Why Your House Won’t Sell

This Guest Blog was written by Alice Robertson of TidyHome.info Image from Pixabay

Is your home stuck in limbo? You know that it’s a great house, but for some reason, it won’t budge from the market. The truth is, many novice sellers tend to make the same set of mistakes. Here are some of the most common errors that are keeping your home from selling.

It’s Cluttered

Clutter is one of the biggest reasons that houses stay trapped in limbo, even in a seller’s market.

This is for a few main reasons:

  • Buyers need to be able to envision themselves in the home.
  • First impressions matter.
  • Buyers want to see that a home has enough space.

If your belongings are in the way, buyers aren’t going to see the house–they’re going to see a mess. That makes it much harder to envision their own possessions taking up space in the house.

This is especially true of closet spaces. Your closets are surprisingly informative of the house and current owners. They can also give a lot of false impressions that make it harder to sell the house.

One of the biggest impressions you have to mitigate is the idea that the house is too small for you, which means it will be too small for the buyer. If the closet is stuffed, the shelves are full, and the floor is covered in clothes and shoes, you don’t have enough room for your stuff. 

It’s Personal

Let’s be honest: When a buyer views your home, they don’t want to see your personal things. They want to see the house. If personal belongings are visible throughout the home, they’re deciding whether they like your family enough to buy a house from you rather than judging the house on its own merits.

Unfortunately, there are a lot of ways that your personal life can show through beyond photos and mementos. For example, even if they are clean and their odors have been removed, pets are a major turnoff for many buyers. If you’re going to show your house, make sure that your pets are somewhere else that day. Also, make sure to remove all pet paraphernalia, including bowls, litter boxes, and toys.

Also, keep in mind that animal-made fabrics and objects can be just as offensive. Antlers, animal fur, and taxidermy should all be packed away and off the premises before buyers show up.

Similarly, anything religious, political, or otherwise polarizing should be removed. Crosses, flags, and even sports memorabilia should be put into storage.

It’s Not Ready to Perform

Home staging is making your home camera-ready, literally and figuratively. You’re arranging your home in a way that brings out its best features, like a fireplace or great kitchen space, and hides its worst features, like small rooms or limited light. Without proper staging, your home may take longer to sell.

Staging involves two parts: removing your personality and replacing it with tasteful, inviting accents. For example, in the kitchen, you want buyers to see the “heart of the home.” Put out large bowls of fruit and colorful cookbooks for bursts of color.

It’s Not Being Handled by a Real Estate Agent

Finally, when preparing your home for sale, make sure to consult with a real estate agent who has experience with performing home sales in your neighborhood. If you aren’t using a real estate agent, then your home isn’t putting its best foot forward.

A real estate agent will offer an objective viewpoint and will view the house the same way that potential buyers will. That means that they will know which areas of the home need particular attention before showing.

A good real estate agent also knows the impact of your neighborhood on your home value. They know how to price your home relative to current and historic home values. Plus, they know how to assess your home’s features in comparison to other homes in the neighborhood.

Take Control of Your Home Sale

Selling your home and living in your home are two very different things. You have to be prepared to market your home just like you would market a product–and that means going the extra mile to make your house the best on the block.

It’s Personal